Poppy Fields, Leamington Spa, 2021

The Leamington Spa poppy field sprung up in June 2021.  At the time I was just so happy that the field was near to home.  I remember going to the field one barmy summer’s evening to take photographs.  The light was beautiful and the field was so colourful with the poppies swaying in the gentle breeze.  I stayed there late into the evening well after sunset taking many pictures.  I wrote a blog about my time there.  One of my pictures was of several poppies standing proud against the colourful sky.  One picture from that evening at Leamington Spa became a slow burner.  I had two requests from charitable organisations wishing to use the picture to advertise their remembrance day activities.   In 2023, I decided to enter the International Garden Photographer of the Year (IGPOTY) award.  Many of my poppy field photographs were appropriate for the Wildflower Landscapes category.  I entered pictures from my visits to Worcestershire last year and with one entry to complete, I selected the Leamington Spa poppy field picture.  I was surprised and pleased that this was the picture that was shortlisted.  Then I was more pleased that the picture was highly commended in the final judging. This slow burner of a picture had done well and is now included in my slowly increasing portfolio of competition successes.

Well done to the winners and all the other entrants. This link opens up the Wildflower landscape awards section of the competition.

Reflections on my success.  

I can remember taking this picture and the composition was different to my normal views of wildflowers. I had deliberately taken a low down viewpoint and used an onboard flash to pick out the flowers. Initially I was unsure of the picture and almost disowned the view. However, common sense prevailed and I posted the picture on my blog and social media accounts.  I was taken aback that I had requests from different charitable organisations that wished to use the picture in promoting remembrance day events.  When the time came to enter IGPOTY, I chose to add this picture to my portfolio.  Even though the picture was taken two years ago, I thought it may catch the eye of the judges. The picture received a highly commendation award and I received many good wishes from friends about the picture.  What can I say about providing advice about your photographic work.  Never give up on your work. Most of my pictures are taken for personal enjoyment. I also enjoy the feedback from family and friends who enjoy seeing my pictures. Also remember that what you may think is not ideal may strongly resonate with other people.  Finally think differently. By all means take the pictures that look like they are from a postcard but they do not necessarily win competitions. Something quirky or a scene that has not been photographed before will generate interest. Such pictures are more difficult to find but if you keep looking you will find them!

This is my original post from the poppy field in Leamington Spa. A special evening.

Poppy Fields in Leamington Spa

Latest products

Starling Murmuration – Metal print

Starling Murmuration – Metal print

“There is likely to be a starling murmuration on Sunday night. This metal print is a dimensional and high-quality piece…

Visit to Confetti fields and Pershore, 2023

There is a rush of colour to the eyes when you first see the Confetti Fields in Wick near Pershore. The family have been going to the fields since 2018 and every time the colours of the flowers surprise me.  The delphinium flowers are white, purple, pink, or lilac blue. They are set out in lines along the field in a regimented style.  Nature has a few quirks as in each line of colour there is some cross contamination that adds a small local contrast of colour.  One line is of mixed colour and then around the edges are wildflower displays which add another touch of contrast.  The family enjoy the day out to the fields and on arrival we walk to the top of the field before slowly making our way back through the paths created in the lines of flowers.  Along the way there are lengthy stops for photographs.  The viewing platform provides an overall view of the whole field and my grandchildren enjoy the trip up the steps to see the colourful flowers up high.

Visit to Confetti fields and Pershore, 2023
A happy granddaughter in the fields
Visit to Confetti fields and Pershore, 2023
Selfie taking in the fields
Visit to Confetti fields and Pershore, 2023
The fields are great for those extra special family portraits.

This year I brought along my 85mm portrait lens, and it proved to be a big success in the family portraits.  The lens gives a superb focus and a nice bokeh to the pictures.  Having taken in the flower fields, we walk past the refreshments to the car.  We learnt long ago that buying bunches of delphiniums cause problems.  They look delightful to begin with but rapidly shed their petals when placed in a flower vase.

Visit to Confetti fields and Pershore, 2023
More colourful pictures of the Confetti fields.
Visit to Confetti fields and Pershore, 2023
Matching colours

Every year we have a picnic ready for the park in Pershore which is near to the Abbey.  However, this year our visit clashed with a brass band festival.  Everywhere was busy and there were no parking places available.  We were very disappointed.  As we headed out of Pershore, my daughter and I remembered a small car park that we had driven past near to the old Pershore bridge.  We pulled into the car park and found spaces.  There were also picnic benches.  A bonus included a viewing platform overlooking the river Avon.  The platform was between the new and old bridge and allowed us to view people kayaking on the river.  As several narrowboats passed by, the grandchildren were able to wave to the people on board.  Whilst we were on the platform, I met Rob preparing his kayak for a paddle on the river Avon. My picture shows him setting up his kayak surrounded by the other equipment laid out on the viewing platform. 

Visit to Confetti fields and Pershore, 2023
Waving to the narrowboats passing by.

The historic Pershore bridge, which is now pedestrian only, has so much history attached to it. In 1413, the abbot of Pershore Abbey lost his life here on the old wooden bridge, The monks rebuilt it in stone. During the English Civil war, the King ordered the bridge to be destroyed to prevent the advancing Parliamentarian army from crossing it. The demolition, led by a Major Bridge, went disastrously wrong leading to the deaths by drowning of 40 Royalist soldiers. In World War 2 ,the bridge was fortified in the event of a German invasion. 

Visit to Confetti fields and Pershore, 2023
Rob preparing his Kayak for the river.

Now the place is a picnic area and Rob can kayak peacefully beyond the bridge from Pershore to Evesham. 

Visit to Confetti fields and Pershore, 2023
I brought along an old Polaroid Pogo allowing the pictures to be printed on the spot.

The family loved the day as can be seen from the photographs.  If you want to learn more about our day out then I have provided some links below

The Real Confetti Flower company

Visit Pershore with details of all the activities in the area

I also recorded past visits to the Confetti fields in 2020, 2019, and 2018. Pictures from 2021 and 2022 were featured on my Flickr and Instagram accounts.

Latest products

Starling Murmuration – Metal print

Starling Murmuration – Metal print

“There is likely to be a starling murmuration on Sunday night. This metal print is a dimensional and high-quality piece…

Maxstoke Castle, Near Coleshill, June 2023.

Maxstoke Castle is very distinctive built in red brick with all the requirements for being a castle on the checklist. There are walls and towers with a large moat circling the building. Inside there are living quarters and gardens. Maxstoke is said to be very unusual because the castle is still the same as when it was built in 1345.  During the English Civil War the castle was used as a garrison by the Parliamentary troops and did not sustain any damage.  Situated near to Coleshill in the green belt between Birmingham and Coventry, Maxstoke castle is now privately owned.  I learnt that there is a strong connection between Maxstoke and Packwood house which happened when there was a marriage between the two families in the 18th Century. Most of the information about the castle can be gleaned from the internet. However what really fascinated me was the majestic appearance of the castle and I was very keen to photograph the place.

Maxstoke Castle, Near Coleshill, June 2023.
Looking up at the front towers of the entrance.
Maxstoke Castle, Near Coleshill, June 2023.
Detail of the house in the central courtyard
Maxstoke Castle, Near Coleshill, June 2023.
Roses and windows

The castle opens up for one day a year for local charities which this year were the Coleshill Parish Church
restoration project and the National Gardens Scheme. The day was very hot and when we arrived, there were queues outside the entrance. We were advised to return in 20 minutes so we took time to stroll around nearby Shustoke reservoir. When we came back to the entrance, we were initially worried that we would not get in again but lucky the gates opened. The entrance to the castle is very photogenic as the trees lead you to the castle and the view opens up to show the grand architecture. I moved to the left and found a view which captured the reflections of the castle in the moat with the water lilies creating a foreground feature. Once we had stocked up with drinking water and cake, we began exploring. My grandson immediately noticed the damsel files and dragonflies darting around the edges of the moat. There was a lady painting the castle in watercolours and I am not sure how she kept her concentration with all the questions from passersby. Inside the castle, there was a chance to see the various treasures in the house but the queue was long and there will always be next year to prioritise this when visiting. Instead we wandered around the castle admiring the gardens and the views.

There were many people at the castle and there was an eye catching group of Seam Punks who were dressed in bright clothes. They just love having their photograph taken with the castle as a backdrop. I enjoyed the day even though the sun was strong creating difficult shadows for the camera.

Maxstoke Castle, Near Coleshill, June 2023.
View of the moat
Maxstoke Castle, Near Coleshill, June 2023.
Climbing roses on the castle walls.
They were more than happy to have their photographs taken with the castle as a backdrop.  I enjoyed the day even though the sun was strong creating difficult shadows for the camera.
Queues for the house tours.
Maxstoke Castle, Near Coleshill, June 2023.
Noah holding a Steampunk ogre (pic by Katie Morgan)

On the way out, there was a display of MG cars from a local owners club. The two yellow MGs looked amazing although the others did not disappoint.

Maxstoke Castle, Near Coleshill, June 2023.
Noah, my grandson with Teddy Bear and a red MG.
Maxstoke Castle, Near Coleshill, June 2023.
MG sports car
Maxstoke Castle, Near Coleshill, June 2023.
MG sports car decked out with Union Jacks.

If you like my pictures and blog then keep a look out for the open day next year. The castle is worth visiting and as mentioned the entrance fee helps several local charities. As a family, we enjoyed the day and my grandson loved seeing the damsel flies, pretending to live in the castle and seeing the sports cars. He even got to hold one of the Steampunk ogres!

Maxstoke Castle, Near Coleshill, June 2023.
Visitors to the castle.
Maxstoke Castle, Near Coleshill, June 2023.
The long entrance driveway to Maxstoke Castle.

You may wish to read my visit to Kenilworth Castle which is not so far away and owned by English Heritage.

Latest products

Starling Murmuration – Metal print

Starling Murmuration – Metal print

“There is likely to be a starling murmuration on Sunday night. This metal print is a dimensional and high-quality piece…

Winterbourne House and Gardens, The University of Birmingham, May 2023

As the weather improves and spring is well established, there are lots more opportunities to photograph gardens. One of the best gardens to visit in Birmingham is Winterbourne House. This Edwardian house and garden have a captivating charm. The House was originally owned by the Nettlefold family and has a long history. The House and Gardens are owned by the University of Birmingham. The house has been restored to what it would have been like at the time of the Nettlefold family. The gardens that surround the house are an example of Edwardian living and several acres are planned out to take advantage of the lay of the land. There are several areas including the walled garden, a lime walk, a rhododendron walk and a glass house area. At the furthest end of the garden is the Japanese bridge and sandstone rock garden. All through the gardens is the influence of the Edwardian approach to design and then there are quirky structures created by the University of Birmingham during its ownership.

The Gardens

Winterbourne House and Gardens, The University of Birmingham, May 2023
The classic view of the Edwardian house from the Nut walk.
Winterbourne House and Gardens, The University of Birmingham, May 2023
The Japanese garden bridge in Black and White.
Winterbourne House and Gardens, The University of Birmingham, May 2023
A place to rest and admire the garden.
Winterbourne House and Gardens, The University of Birmingham, May 2023
The bluebell walk adjacent to Winterbourne.

Glass Houses and Alpine Garden

Winterbourne House

The house has been restored and the rooms reflect how an Edwardian family will have lived their lives in the building. There was ample opportunity to view the bedrooms and admire the collections of belongings including children’s toys.

Winterbourne House and Gardens, The University of Birmingham, May 2023
Top of the stairs

More views around the Gardens

Winterbourne House and Gardens, The University of Birmingham, May 2023
Colours in the water of the sandstone rock pools.
Winterbourne House and Gardens, The University of Birmingham, May 2023
Detail in the greenhouse
Winterbourne House and Gardens, The University of Birmingham, May 2023
Pathway to the garden.

There were around 20 IgersbirminghamUK photographers and we all enjoyed taking the photographs and also meeting each other to have a chat and catch up on the world of photography. Many of us met at the terrace for a cup of tea and a chat before moving on to the rest of the weekend. These are a selection of my pictures and I would encourage you to view other photographers pictures which are posted on Instagram.

Follow the tags #igersbirminghamUk, #igbUk_meet_winterbourne and #winterbourneHG.

I have two other posts on Winterbourne one written before the Pandemic and the other when the house reopened after the Lockdowns. They give more insights into this wonderful place in Edgbaston.


Latest products

Starling Murmuration – Metal print

Starling Murmuration – Metal print

“There is likely to be a starling murmuration on Sunday night. This metal print is a dimensional and high-quality piece…

Streets of Canals of Utrecht, The Netherlands, April 2023.

I had the opportunity to take pictures during a recent visit to the streets and canals of Utrecht

Utrecht in the Netherlands was the base for the Ultrasonics Industry Association conference.  My research group were presenting at the international conference and I was there to support their activities.  We stayed in the Karel V hotel which has a picturesque view of the adjacent canal.  There were many opportunities in the early morning or during conference breaks to explore the streets and canals.  This Dutch city is very photogenic and I had brought along my Fujifilm x100v to accompany my iPhone13 for the photographs.  For the readers of this blog, I will just show a selection of the many pictures that I took during my short stay.  At the end of the blog, I have provided some links to Utrecht which provide ideas for your travel to this ever-surprising city.

Streets of Canals of Utrecht, The Netherlands, April 2023.
Early morning in Utrecht.
Streets of Canals of Utrecht, The Netherlands, April 2023.
Another early morning view.
Streets of Canals of Utrecht, The Netherlands, April 2023.
Canal reflections.
Streets of Canals of Utrecht, The Netherlands, April 2023.
A nod to Greek architecture.
Streets of Canals of Utrecht, The Netherlands, April 2023.
Flowers, bikes and the canals.
Streets of Canals of Utrecht, The Netherlands, April 2023.
Canal scene in black and white.
Streets of Canals of Utrecht, The Netherlands, April 2023.
Windmill
Streets of Canals of Utrecht, The Netherlands, April 2023.
Real and unreal.
Streets of Canals of Utrecht, The Netherlands, April 2023.
Reflections.
Streets of Canals of Utrecht, The Netherlands, April 2023.
Streetlife
Streets of Canals of Utrecht, The Netherlands, April 2023.
The train station.
Streets of Canals of Utrecht, The Netherlands, April 2023.
More canal scenes in Utrecht
Streets of Canals of Utrecht, The Netherlands, April 2023.
The Utrechts Conservatorium and part of the Utrecht School of the Arts
Streets of Canals of Utrecht, The Netherlands, April 2023.
Biking over the canals of Utrecht.
Streets of Canals of Utrecht, The Netherlands, April 2023.
The holocaust memorial to people murdered in Utrecht during WWII.

So many pictures of this city and here are some more from both iPhone and camera.


Do you want to know more about Utrecht? Here are some links
Discover Utrecht
Holland Travel Guide

Latest products

Starling Murmuration – Metal print

Starling Murmuration – Metal print

“There is likely to be a starling murmuration on Sunday night. This metal print is a dimensional and high-quality piece…

Bluebell Walk, Heart of England Forest, Great Alne. April 2023

Who doesn’t love the sight of bluebells gently swaying in the breeze.  Many of our ancient woodlands are at risk by the creeping threat of development and that is why I support the annual Bluebell Wood Fundraising Open Day in the Heart of England Forest.  Conserving our woodlands for future generations is very much a priority.  Great Alne Woodland is just off Spurnal Lane, and is a part of a Natural Burial Ground.  The ancient wood has a stunning display of bluebells at the end of April and is open to visitors for two days.  

Bluebell Walk, Heart of England Forest, Great Alne. April 2023
A typical woodland scene with bluebells.
Bluebell Walk, Heart of England Forest, Great Alne. April 2023
Bluebell carpet running up the hill.
Bluebell Walk, Heart of England Forest, Great Alne. April 2023
Bluebells gather around a fallen tree.
Bluebell Walk, Heart of England Forest, Great Alne. April 2023
Bluebells with a scattering of white bluebell flowers.

My daughter loves visiting this quiet and picturesque woodland and there are so many good photographic opportunities.  I brought along my camera equipment and found that the early morning light was perfect.  The contrast of blue and green is a joy to see and photograph.  My lensball was also put to good use for a few pictures.  A useful photographic tip for maximising the benefit of your lensball is to use your macro lens for the pictures. This technique works a treat.  

Bluebell Walk, Heart of England Forest, Great Alne. April 2023
Using my lensball in the bluebell forest.

My 52 week project challenge was bokeh and the bluebells provided several opportunities to focus on the flowers with a wide open lens (f/2.8). This throws the background out of focus producing lovely Bokeh.  

Bluebell Walk, Heart of England Forest, Great Alne. April 2023
A bluebell with a blue background.

During my visit to the woodland, I met Toby, who is the organiser of this charity event.  He kindly agreed to have his picture taken and be part of my 100 strangers project which is slowly moving forward on my Flickr pages.

Bluebell Walk, Heart of England Forest, Great Alne. April 2023
This is Toby who organises the Bluebell charity walk.

The organisation of the day is excellent.  The walk starts in the car park and takes you through the woodland with some well positioned spots for those important selfies.  I noticed that the event is becoming more popular but via the use of ticketing, our family took part in the walk and did not meet many other people.  For a short time, the woodland was ours to enjoy and we were able to take in the sights of those beautiful bluebells.  My grandson loves the place as you can see from the following pictures.

Bluebell Walk, Heart of England Forest, Great Alne. April 2023
A boy and his dog.
Bluebell Walk, Heart of England Forest, Great Alne. April 2023
A portrait in the bluebell forest.

Please consider donating to the Heart of England Forest charity and look out for future events that they organise.

If you want to see my other blogs on Bluebells, including last year’s walk in the wood, then I have provided links below.  


Latest products

Starling Murmuration – Metal print

Starling Murmuration – Metal print

“There is likely to be a starling murmuration on Sunday night. This metal print is a dimensional and high-quality piece…

Flowers in the garden, April 2023

Using a ring flash in dentistry was second nature. Having learnt how to photograph the teeth and other structures around the mouth, macro was second nature. There were two good mentors to my macro photography. A medical photographer at Wordsley hospital. I can not remember her name and Wordsley hospital is no more. However she instilled a discipline and love of macro photography. Then there was Mike Sharland at Birmingham Dental School. He set up your camera and showed you how to gently rock back and forth using manual focus. The settings were Manual Flash half a second, aperture f/22, shutter speed 1/200s and an ISO 100. These are your go to settings and then you can experiment from here.

Flowers in the garden, April 2023
Close up of a wild Daffodil.
Flowers in the garden, April 2023
Wild Daffodils
Flowers in the garden, April 2023
Hellebores.

Gardens are just great places for macro weather you want to photograph flowers or insects such as bees and butterflies. I dusted off my macro lens with ring flash and wandered around the garden. For this series of photographs, I find the way that the subject is illuminated and the background is dark attractive. There is little in the way of distracting background around. Hope you enjoy these photographs of flowers. By the way, if you are like me and do not know the name of the flowers then there is a very good app, PictureThis, that takes a picture and hey presto the name of the flower is revealed.

Flowers in the garden, April 2023
Daffodils and Hyacinths
Flowers in the garden, April 2023
Common Hyacinth.
Flowers in the garden, April 2023
Grape hyacinth.
Flowers in the garden, April 2023
Forget me not (Siberian bugloss)

Finally a big shout out to @hortihenleygardening for their work in my garden.

If you enjoyed this then please take a look at these blog postings

Latest products

Starling Murmuration – Metal print

Starling Murmuration – Metal print

“There is likely to be a starling murmuration on Sunday night. This metal print is a dimensional and high-quality piece…

Poppy Fields, Leamington Spa, 2021

Poppy field season is upon us and after a very damp May, it is noticeable that many plants and flowers are delayed in making their appearance by around 2 to 3 weeks.  The recent bout of sunshine has had a dramatic effect on everything, stimulating the countryside into life.  It is lovely to see all the flowers in full bloom.  But back to poppies, each year one finds it increasingly difficult to find these elusive flowers.  Farmers appear reluctant to let their fields turn into a sea of red for fear of the unwelcome attraction it brings.  For photographers such red carpets are a heavenly delight designed by the supreme being to bring joy to anybody who loves taking a picture.  Keeping to the sides of the field and not trampling the delicate flowers into the ground is part of our photographic code.  We too are horrified by the poor regard some members of the public have for poppy fields which in turn make it difficult for others. Therefore if visiting such places then respect the countryside.

Poppy Field
A carpet of red

I got the call (via Facebook) from my Photo Buddy, John Bray, informing me that a Poppy Field had been sighted just north of Leamington Spa.  It had already been announced on the local Facebook pages.  The field is not that accessible being surrounded on two sides by a country road that is better described as speed test track for the locals.  The partially hidden gate leads into the field which has a gentle westerly elevation.  Taking care not to trample more vegetation than is absolutely necessary, we slowly navigate ourselves to the top of the field taking pictures along the way.  We arrived at the field at 7.30pm and then by 8.45pm we had filled up our photocards with red poppies.  There will be some serious editing of the numbers of pictures taken when I get back home. 

Poppy Field
Making sure to stay to the paths around the field

When you are in a poppy field there is the intense red of the flower petals and then there is the gentle swaying of the stems in the breeze.  It is most restful and soothing to gaze over the red rippling petals of the flowers.

Taking pictures of poppies is one of personal taste.  I like the distant telephoto shots where the flowers are compressed, and you are able to convey the carpet of red.  For many of the pictures. I placed my polariser filter on the lens so as to pick out the reds.  Also concentration is needed so that the horizon does not go wonky or there are any unnecessary distractions inadvertently included in the picture. 

Poppy Field
Some poppies are higher than others
Poppy Field
The Poppy Field set in the surrounding countryside

There was strong sunlight, so I was able to use it to my advantage to back light the stems of the poppies.  This makes for an attractive look and highlights the spikey hairs on the stems. 

Poppy Field
Back lit poppies

There is also the “kitchen sink factor” where I wish I had brought all my lenses including my wide angled lens.  I should also have brought my graduated filters.  What I did bring that still surprises me with its quality, is my Fujifilm x100v and of course I did have my iPhone.  But the workhorse of the evening was my Canon 5D mark IV with both 24-105mm and the 70-200mm lens.  And the all-important tripod.

Poppy Field
Captured in a mini world

I also brought my lens ball.  I never know when it is going to be a good picture when I use it.  I was happy with the result of this picture with the poppies even though it was hand held.

Poppy Field
Deep red poppy colour

Decision time!  Where is the best picture for that sunset view?  There is a hint that we may get a colourful sunset, so we had to find the ideal place.  This is where you get an adrenaline rush and we pushed to the back of the field.  There was dense overgrowth but luckily there was a path on the perimeter that allowed us to get a view of the sunset radiating over the field.  We were happy with the position of our cameras on for the photographs.  Taking pictures of the sunset can be tricky and without my graduated filter (mental note must remember to bring this in future trips), I took several bracketed shots with the intention of building up a HDR picture later.  As the light dropped it was possible to compensate for the exposure.

Poppy Field
Sunset clouds and poppies

Then the sunset came into its own and the sky turned a pinky red.  Remember earlier that I said that there is someone up there who enjoys seeing a good photograph.  Well he or she decided to turn on the light show, and it was very much appreciated.  I just retreated into a happy world of taking pictures.  Surfacing around 10 o’clock it was dark, and we had filled our cameras with enough poppy pictures for the evening.

Poppy Field
Beautiful sunset complimenting the poppies
Poppy Field
Yellows and reds of the sunset
Poppy Field
A yellow sky
Poppy Field
A line of red holding up the sunset

Walking back to the car I turned back for one last look and there was the crescent moon in the sky with the embers of the sunset still illuminating the red poppies.  I reflected positively on the evening and John said it had been “A perfect antidote to a crazy life”.

Thank you, Poppies.

Poppy Field
The moon over the poppy field

If you enjoyed reading about this poppy field then you may wish to read my previous blog on Poppy Fields and my other entries on the Cotswolds Lavender fields


As the University of Birmingham locked down so did Winterbourne house and gardens. There was still a small team of gardeners tendering the gardens during lockdown. As the restrictions eased, the gardens reopened to University staff on the 6th July. It is one of the perks of working at the University that you have free access to the Botanical gardens. I took the opportunity on a Friday afternoon to visit Winterbourne and it coincided with a break in the weather. Yes, the sun was seen in the sky! I brought along my macro lens and decided that it was going to be a close up day photographing the flowers and some of the friends that visit them as well.

A zoom of colour!
Nature’s helper
Prickly
Summer in full swing

I realise now that what I enjoy about garden photography is the symmetry of the flowers. Also I like the asymmetry that is overlayered on the symmetry. The colours and the flower arrangements right down to the petals play a part too.

Symmetry and colours
A busy bee
Lilies in the sunshine

Winterbourne has different areas to it and there is a brook at the bottom of the hill with an Japanese oriental garden. On the way down, there are many flower beds and open spaces. Towards the house there is the walled garden and glasshouses that have a large variety of interesting species.

Can you spot the spider?
Lovely colours
A play on light and colour

Why do I love Winterbourne so much? I think it is the range of plants that come from around the world. Part of my role at the University is Director of Global Engagement. The Winterbourne Gardens web site mentions that the plant collection is taken from countries such as China, North and South America and the Alpine areas of the world. Maybe this is why walking around the Botanical Gardens feels as if you are undertaking international travel in a short space of time and distance.

Temporary entrance with social distancing sign into the walled garden
The lime walk
Walkway through the garden
Symmetry in the onion vegetable patch

Finally, whilst I love taking pictures of the plants, I do not know many of their names. So if anyone is able to help so that I can name them correctly it would be very much appreciated 🙂

Winterbourne house

During the weeks of lockdown, the garden flowers and blossom start to look very attractive objects to photograph. luckily I have my macro 100mm and ring flash to take pictures. I have also experimented with different views of the flowers from the more traditional look to close up macro. I have also looked at different lighting approaches. Here are a few of my pictures taken in my garden during April 2020 lockdown.

Dragon head flowers
This was a stacked picture of 6 photographs
Star Tulip
Magnolia Blossom
The colour purple
Dandelion close up
….but the flowers have a limited life